Category Archives: Cultura

Save the Date~ Aug. 1 – All About Ann in Houston

allaboutann

 

HOUSTON, TX – On Friday August 1, Annie’s List and Planned Parenthood Texas Votes, in partnership with a number of local elected officials and organizations, will bring “All About Ann”, HBO’s documentary about former Texas Governor Ann Richards, to Houston for FREE!

Beginning at 8:00PM with live music, food and drinks, join us at Discovery Green’s Anheuser Busch Stage and enjoy this wonderful documentary about Texas’ only female Governor as we all work hard this fall to have Wendy Davis as the second woman in the Governor’s House!

Drinks will be donated by 8th Wonder Brewery and Mayor Annise Parker will introduce the film.

State Senators John Whitmire, Rodney Ellis and Sylvia Garcia, State Representatives Senfronia Thompson and Armando Walle, Mayor Annise Parker, Ambassador Arthur Schechter, Hon. Debra Danburg as well as Annie’s List Board Members Licia Green-Ellis, Eileen Olson, Kathy Overly and Amber Mostyn are just some of the proud hosts of this event.

RSVP at www.pptexasvotes.org/AllAboutAnn. If you are interesting in joining the host committee to help cover costs of the event or are interested in a table at the event, please contact Shelby Hansen at Shelby@LillieSchechter.com or 281-224-4525.

“All About Ann”: Fiesty, fiery, fearless, a force of nature . . . and funny as hell. These are just some of the words used to describe Ann Richards, one of the most charismatic American political figures of the last 30 years. This portrait chronicles the life of the liberal Richards who rose to power in a conservative state, effecting sweeping state reforms while becoming a beloved national icon.

Continue reading

About these ads

A Wish for World Peace ~ Paz Mundial by Johnny Hernandez

DC Reviews: Gary Hobbs ~ Live From New West

Still riding high after over 30 years on the road, Tejano crooner Gary Hobbs, offers his fans a live album recorded at Dallas’ New West Night Club.

Full of hits from the 90s heyday of Tejano music, these remain on his nightly playlist. Hobbs hasn’t lost that golden voice and always has good musicians to back him up.

ghobbsThe CD kicks off with recent hit, Por Ti, and includes some acordeon-heavy tunes, like Tres Rosas and Buscando Un Amor. Gary Hobbs loyalists will never forget Las Miradas, Amame y Besame, Maldito Amor, and Vas A Pagar. Hobbs adds three memorable cumbias with Te Vas A AcordarPor Favor Corazon and Chiquitita, Chiquitita, which have always been fan favorites.

Thrown in from the 80s was one of my personal favorites, Diferentes.

Hobbs has remained a tried and true Tejano music ambassador, always staying true to the genre and taking it across the country. No doubt he’ll keep fighting to keep Tejano music alive and kicking.

This is definitely a collector’s item for loyal Gary Hobbs fans. Personally, I’ve been a fan since the early 80s. I’m willing to admit that at one time, I owned the 45 rpm of Contigo Aprendi when the band was called Brando Mireles and the Hot Sauce Band featuring Gary Hobbs. But that’s for another blog post.

Get yours today! It’s even on iTunes!

 

 

3rd Centavo: Acuña ~ Identity: Mexican or American First?

by Rodolfo F. Acuña

uglyWhat are you, a Mexican or an American? This was a question asked frequently when I was a growing – much more than it is today. This is perhaps because at that time we were clearly a minority and racism was more transparent and acceptable. It was a time when people believed that Jews killed Christ and Mexicans massacred Davey Crockett at the Alamo. The result was that this forced me to think in terms of “them and us.”

I was probably eight or so when my school mates first asked me and my cousin whether we would fight for Mexico or the United States. The question tore me up. I could not imagine shooting my father. The teachers did not help always referring to Mexico as a backward country.

A large map of North America donned the classroom wall. Canada, the U.S.’s friend, was on top, and Mexico was on the bottom. There were frequent jokes and put downs such as “If you don’t like it go back to Tijuana.”

The question of what are you first is not surprising, Americans are obsessed with policing loyalty. During the 1920s the American Firsters changed the pledge of allegiance from “I pledge allegiance to my flag” to “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America” – they wanted to make sure that someone was not pledging allegiance to some foreign flag.

Early visitors to the U.S. noted American racial xenophobia that forged a national inferiority complex. America through the eyes of European visitors such as Alexis de Tocqueville gives us a window into the past. While many admired the opportunities for land in the new nation, they also made biting observations about American attitudes. Nothing in the United States was authentic, for example, not even American English, which was a wannabe version of British English.

De Tocqueville noted the obsession of Americans for material objects: “…I know of no other country where love of money has such a grip on men’s hearts or where stronger scorn is expressed for the theory of permanent equality of property.”

Although it was a love-hate relationship, the standard for Americans was Europe. Europe had a history, the United States did not. Europe had traditions, the United States did not. An abundance of western land kept alive myths of opportunity for some, but for the African slave whose labor built not only the south but the nation the inequality was rationalized.

To justify inequality whites formed opinions on the moral and intellectual inferiority of their former slaves. When immigrants entered Pleasantville, equality was based not only on on the hue of their skin but on property that increasingly took the form of capital.

So naturally the Mexicans’ equality was measured by the hue of their skin and the amount of wealth they possessed. In order to justify the inequality of Mexicans they manufactured myths that the United States did not invade Mexico, but re-annexed it. Social and biological explanations were also manufactured such as the Mexican’s moral and intellectual inferiority.

White Americans of my generation questioned, why would anyone want to be anything but American? Everyone wanted to come to America didn’t they? They believed that the U.S. was different from other nation states. It did not make war – the U.S. was forced to defend democracy.

Even in the 1950s when I was in the army a dichotomy existed. Even though you wore an American uniform, you weren’t really an American. At the time, there were the spics (Mexicans and Puerto Ricans), the Italians, the Polacks, the Jews and the Negros in the army. The Americans were white.

The army changed my worldview. I had some opportunities because my area scores were higher than others. But I was often asked how come I was a company clerk and then a supply sergeant. There weren’t too many of us in these positions. The army was the first place where I encountered a vicious form of racism. I remember that outside the base in Augsburg, Germany, the night clubs were segregated, and there were mini-race riots.

After my discharge I returned to school. I worked sixty hours a week and carried 18 units. Los Angeles State was the best thing that ever happened to me. I got my BA and then my MA in history there.

My first teaching job was at the West Coast Talmudical Seminary — taught grades K-12, I was its only goy teacher. Orthodox Jews at the time were shunned by the other Jewish sects.

In 1958 I began teaching at San Fernando Junior High. I was introduced by the principal as her “Mexican teacher.” At the time most of the Mexican American students were born in the USA yet they were referred to as Mexicans — the blacks as Negros and the whites as Americans. The contradiction was that they expected us to be grateful for being American.

Once the other teachers became comfortable with me, they began asking me questions like why a Mexican student got into a fight or why he didn’t do his homework? How the hell should I know? It was like me asking them why Charles Manson did what he did?

When a Mexican parent filed a rare complaint, the teachers in the smoking room asked me, “Are you a Mexican or a teacher first?” Frankly, at first I was taken aback. What was the contradiction? I was not as brazen as I later became and tried to reason with them. I was on probation and did not have tenure. The first time I applied for a teacher position with the LA City Schools I was rejected because, they said, I had gone to parochial schools.

Throughout my three years at the junior high school the question kept coming up, “Are you a Mexican or a teacher first?” It was not only me but also the lone Black teacher who everyone liked because he pandered to them. He advised me to play the game.

When I transferred to a high school things were different. I had tenure, and I had job offers from the private sector. About a year into the job, again in the smoking room, I was asked, “Are you a Mexican or a teacher first?” I responded that my birth certificate says “Mexican” so I guess I am a Mexican first. The question was also asked when I began my opposition to the Vietnam War and the invasion of Santo Domingo – Are you a Mexican or an American first?

I had entered the doctoral program in Latin American Studies at the University of Southern California and was studying about U.S.-Latin American relations. This led to my questioning, why would anyone want to be an American? When I traveled in Mexico and other countries I was ashamed of the “ugly Americans” who demanded service by waving dollars at the Volkswagen Service Manager.

To make a long story short, the question, “Are you a Mexican or an American or a teacher first? has today taken on a new meaning. I am a teacher and that means teaching all students. Being Mexican means advocating for the interests of Mexican, Latino and working class students.

Being a Mexican first makes me a member of an oppressed minority. In so many instances I have witnessed Albert Memmi’s prophesy in The Colonizer and the Colonized come true with the colonized becoming the colonizer. Being an American is nothing exceptional and should not negate other identities such as Mexican, Latino, African, Native American, Asian or human being. It should not delude us into believing that we equally benefit from our corporate state that has no nationality.

Meanwhile, it is somewhat pathetic that people still ask, am I your first love?

Rodolfo Acuña, Ph.D., is an historian, professor emeritus, and one of various scholars of Chicano studies, which he teaches at California State University, Northridge. He is the author of Occupied America: A History of ChicanosDr. Acuña writes various opinions and essays on his Facebook page and allows sites to share his thoughts.

DC Reviews: La Mafia ~ Amor y Sexo

lamafia2After a long time without a studio album, the Pride of the Northside is back with the much anticipated Amor y Sexo. While the music is “pura Mafia” the playlist is a bit different.

As any Mafioso who grew up with them in the Tejano 80s, weathered their change to a more international sound in the 90s, and have enjoyed them bringing all of their sounds back into play in the 2000s, this new production was still a bit of a surprise.

Sure, there are three rancheras–more than usual; but only one cumbia. That’s right, four ballads, two valseadas and a jazzy dance tune round out a slightly different production, but one that keeps the Mafia sound intact.

Seria Mas Facil and Una Cancion Para Olvidar are strong horn-influenced and acordeon-infused rancheras. The latter has some powerful harmonies, too. The acordeon-heavy Protegere Nuestros Recuerdos is a short, but powerful ranchera about a loves end, but with some great memories stored away in case of a return.

Quiero Amarte is the sole cumbia with some pop influences that could make it a fan favorite when played live.  It’s already one of my favorites.

Among the ballads, Provocación is my favorite with its rising chorus and piano-led melody. A surprise tune is the horn-driven jazzy dance tune, Soy Facil, which translated is “I’m Easy.” Great guitar solo in this one. Todo Dama Lo Amerita offers a mariachi- and trio-esque international ballad which fans will enjoy. The opener, Me Mata, and Amor y Sexo are reminiscent of the 90s power ballads that put La Mafia on the international map.

No Me Abandones, restyled from a ranchera on 1989s Mafia Mania, is the quintessential booze-it-up valseada to beg a lover not to leave. Its horn and acordeón arrangements are superb. Adonde Va El Amor is a similarly-styled vals driven by the bajo and acordeon.

Big kudos to Oscar de la Rosa for continuing to school some of the new talent out there on how to sustain a voice 30-plus years later. Mando Lichtenberger deserves a lot of credit as the producer and arranger, too. These guys just haven’t lost their touch.

The new stuff is available on CD and MP3, so it’s available at your favorite big box or online store. Add it to your collection.

 

Save the Date: OCT 26 – Latina-American Women in Music Musical Extravaganza

Editor’s note:  This is something from the inbox which you should put on your calendar, as well as on your list of events to sponsor in 2014. It’s for a great cause and features some great entertainers. Contact my friend Valentina Estrada (contact info at bottom of post) for sponsorship opportunities.

 
lawim
LATINA-AMERICAN
WOMEN IN MUSIC (L.A.W.I.M.)
126 E. 1st Street
Deer Park, TX 77536

You are cordially invited to be part of a “Musical Extravaganza” at The TBH Cultural Arts Center, 333 S. Jensen Drive, Houston, Texas 77003 on Sunday, October 26, 2014 from 7 pm To 10 pm in support of battered and abused individuals.

The Musical Extravaganza is being organized by Latina-American Women In Music (“L.A.W.I.M.”) sponsored by companies and concerned individuals that desire to see a change.

richardL.A.W.I.M.” plans to include several Latina musicians & entertainers to be our guests for the Musical Extravaganza. Each of the Latina artists and entertainers bring a unique style of music! In addition, we will have influential keynote speakers: Richard Yniguez, Actor and Johnny Hernandez, Music Legend and Tejano Pioneer who will share their experience and views on Domestic Violence. (UPDATE:  Unfortunately, Johnny Hernandez will not be able to attend because of a previous engagement.)

johnnyIn addition, many community leaders, organizations and entertainment icons will be at this tremendous event to seal their commitment to support “L.A.W.I.M.” and offer their extraordinary talent and resources to this cause. Their enthusiasm and influential participation in the Latino community has inspired many to achieve higher goals and we are honored that they have committed and pledged their time to participate!

This Musical Extravaganza is expected to be a sell-out and be of great magnitude and become an historic event in Houston. In joining us in this charitable aim your affiliation and presence includes you as a part of making a difference and change in our world.

Proceeds from this event will be committed and used for the specific purpose of helping a Women’s Shelter to reach out and help battered and abused women in our community where the help is much needed and be of support of future events for various causes. “L.A.W.I.M.” has committed to continue the fight for human rights!

Your sponsorship and participation with this human rights event will have a real effect on lives in our communities. Please join us on this evening of great purpose; it will have a lasting impact!

We are thanking you in advance for your support and contribution.

For further information, please feel free to contact us!

Sincerely,

Valentina Estrada
Director of Operations & Events
LATINA-AMERICAN
WOMEN IN MUSIC (L.A.W.I.M.)
(702) 234-9606 – Cell
(360) 234-9608 – Fax 

 

 

LD Poll: Deportations Have Alienated Young Latinos From Dems

I hate to say “I told you so,” but…

Latino Decisions just released some poll data
on how the Obama Administration’s deportation policy is affecting young Latino attitudes toward the Democratic Party.

What seems to have helped the Obama Administration’s approval numbers all these years is a lack of information.

Somewhat surprisingly, as reflected in the figure below, we found that overall knowledge of the Obama administration’s deportation policies is limited.

Good for El Prez these last five years, not good for Latinos who seem to be less engaged every year. As I’ve always said, Republicans may not be pushing “comprehensive immigration reform” but El Prez does hold the keys to the deportation buses. Of course, boasting about deportations doesn’t work, and that trick about calling him “deporter in chief” didn’t seem to help with Republicans, either.

Still, young Latinos seem to know the difference between Democrats and Republicans when it comes to immigration issues.

Our study then tested the effect of additional knowledge of mass deportations by randomly assigning half of the survey participants, after answering the question on deportations under the last two presidents, with the following: “In fact, the Obama administration has deported around one and half times more people each year than the average under President Bush.” We then asked survey participants whether they see the Democratic and Republican parties as “welcoming, unwelcoming, or neither welcoming nor unwelcoming toward Latinos.” In the control condition with no additional information 55% of respondents rated the Democrats as “welcoming,” compared to 45% among those who received the additional information on deportations; this difference is statistically significant. Learning that Obama has been deporting more people per year than his predecessor makes Latinos view the Democratic Party as less welcoming. Only 9% of our sample rated the Republican Party as welcoming to Latinos, with no significant effects for the experiment.

There’s no doubt that President Obama’s approval ratings among Latinos, generally, has taken a significant hit, especially these last few years. And that can be blamed on a blown roll-out of Obamacare and the Obama deportation policies/record. But I would also venture to predict that a good reason for young Latinos still sticking with Democrats and not Republicans is because of public policies that matter most to them:  student loan reform, health care reform, education, etc. Of course, that’s with no added information provided to those polled about other issues. In other words, the major flaw in this poll is a lack of other issues. Because I’d really like to know how young Latinos feel about a whole list of issues.

Bottom line:  It would seem to me that young Latinos are not necessarily single-issue voters. And that may be the only thing that “saves” the Democrats. Of course, a question that needs to be asked is how would they vote in 2014–or, if they even intend to vote in 2014. And if this attitude is affected by the deportation policy, then the Democratic strategy suddenly gets simpler–if the political will exists. And I won’t hold my breath for that. But it does affect the overall strategy of “turnout, turnout, turnout.”

I will say that the Democratic strategy needs to be much better than just pointing fingers at the other side and waiting for Dan Patrick’s mouth to offend 10 million Texas Mexicans and other Latinos. Something’s gotta give.

3rd Centavo: Acuña ~ Is a Free Higher Education a Right or Privilege?

by Rudy F. Acuña

Elites of whatever race, nationality or historical generation have opposed education as a right. During the 19th century New Mexican hacendados justified their opposition to public education on religious grounds because it threatened their hegemony. A popular saying was “educar un muchacho es perder un buen pastor.” Further New Mexican landowners opposed statehood because it meant paying taxes to educate the poor.

The belief that people have a right to a free education whether primary or higher education is threatening to people who fear equality. This is true whether in the United States or Mexico.

In today’s world education is necessary to break out of the minimum wage cycle. This affects minorities most because they are concentrated in the lower half of the economic ladder, and it is becoming the only way out.

However, this phenomena is no longer a minority thing; white workers are flocking to the minimum wage class in great numbers.

In the 1850s Abraham Lincoln was shocked by George Fitzhugh’s thesis in Sociology for the South (1854) and Cannibals All! (1857) that theorized that all labor including white should be slave labor. The notion scared the hell out of Lincoln and white workers. Today a comparison can be drawn between Fitzhugh’s thesis and the growth of the minimum wage as the norm.

Most Americans believe that society will correct itself. They still believe that a person earning a minimum wage is as free as the Koch Brothers or even people like me who have sinecures.

Education has historically been the vehicle for social mobility. Because of this, white Americans after World War II saw education as a right, one of the limited ways out for the working class. Without an education they were condemned to being minimum wage workers.

Like Fitzhugh’s prophecy, the minimum wage worker has become the modern day wage slave. This status is no longer that of people of color. Even college graduates are today shackled by the minimum wage.

The apologists muddle the right to higher education with sayings such as “Education is a right but should be treated as a privilege” that puts the onus on the individual, and qualifies the right to mean that everyone should be able to have access to an education, but that access implies the duty of the student to better themselves. In other words, education is not an absolute right.

In our society the state controls education; it determines whether something is a right or a privilege. But who controls the state? The bottom-line is we are not all equal. We all have one vote, but the Supremes say the corporations are persons, and that it is unconstitutional to limit the amount they can donate to a political campaign because regulation infringes their free speech rights.

It is fallacious to think that I am as free as the Koch brothers who donate a $100 million to political campaigns. It is just as ridiculous to say that minimum wage workers have the same influence as the one top percent.

In the United States, all rights are derived from property. Rights imply a corresponding duty of the holder. In theory, the only limitation on the holder’s rights is the equal rights of others. According to the founding fathers, the ownership of property was the most important distinction between freedom and tyranny.

A lot of water has gone under the bridge since the founding. The notion of property has changed over the years, and today property is synonymous with capital. Even real property has become liquid and reduced to a commodity.

Thus education means the accumulation of capital, and emphasis is put on the rights of the holders, and not their duties. Regulations are efforts to regulate the abuse of the holders who look at regulation as suppression of their freedom rather than the enforcement of their duties. In their worldview capital has rights and the worker only has privileges that can only be exercised at the discretion of those with rights.

It becomes a worker’s duty to work and capital’s right to profit from his/her labor. In this brave new world it is becoming increasingly rare for the poor to own land. The only out is to move up through education.

Mexicans fought a bloody revolution that cost over a million lives for social rights. It was not fought for privileges; it was fought for access to land and liberty!

Rights are very dear, and as one  writer dramatically put it, “our rights come from our creator.” However, they are more fundamental, rights are based on being human. As such government does not have the power to violate a right. Neither does it not have the right to empower corporations to violate our rights.

The Mexican Constitution of 1917 is the first world constitution to set out social rights. The Russian Constitution of 1918 is based the Mexican Constitution. Article 3 guarantees a free, mandatory, and lay education. Today, Mexican students and social reformers are fighting to keep Mexican higher education free and to protect that right.

Yet the Mexican government is surreptitiously undermining the right to free higher education. The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) is at the crossroads of Mexico’s university system. It is a Taj Mahal with the state universities and satellites badly neglected. Given this reality it is natural that every Mexican student dreams of attending it.

If the Mexican government respected the constitution, it would build facilities to accommodate the over 250,000 graduating seniors who are turned away annually. Instead it invents fictions to reject them.

President Enrique Peña Nieto is violating the constitution in the name of reform – a word that the Mexican and American press are giving a bad name. Like the case of corrupt American congressmen, the Mexican president deals with bought legislators who want to protect the rights of the ruling elites. Consequently, as in the United States, Mexican education is becoming a privilege instead of a right.

Similarly access has been restricted in this country. Because corporate leaders do not want to pay for the costs of social production Public universities have stopped building to accommodate the growing student population. Universities operate more and more on student monies.

Rather than fight for the rights of students, American and Mexican bureaucrats use the excuse there is no room. They use gimmicks to limit access and allow runaway tuition and the privatization of higher education.

In 2008, according to the Pew Center, graduating students borrowed 50 percent more (in inflated-adjusted dollars) than those graduating in 1996. Their debt went from $17,075 in 1996 to $23,287 in 2008. Seventy-five percent of the respondents to a poll said college was just too expensive. Almost fifty percent could not afford to go to college.

In a “Time Marches On” fashion, forty years ago education was relatively free. High school students had options such as working at GM Van Nuys, Lockheed, or one of the many factories that serviced these plants. My engineering students in the 1980s worked for the computer industry, earning enough to support themselves and contribute to their families. The majority of these jobs have been outsourced.

In the 1950s, workers were oblivious to deindustrialization and the assault on trade unions. They rationalized that they were different than blacks and Latinos who were at the time denied access to industrial jobs and public colleges. By the 1980s the children of white workers could not find union jobs and were relegated to minimum wage labor. Today our children are forced to live with us; when they can work it is a minimum wage job –it is becoming the standard for all workers.

Rodolfo Acuña, Ph.D., is an historian, professor emeritus, and one of various scholars of Chicano studies, which he teaches at California State University, Northridge. He is the author of Occupied America: A History of ChicanosDr. Acuña writes various opinions and essays on his Facebook page and allows sites to share his thoughts.

El Seis de Apologies, 2014

Someone asked me what the Mexican military did on el Seis de Mayo–drink tequila? With a bit of sarcasm, I responded, “I don’t know, maybe they took the POWs to Guantanamo and tequila-boarded them?” Obviously, that was a dig at our own country who is into that sort of stuff.

Actually, it looks like El Seis will become a day for apologies. MSNBC will apologize for an “ill-advised” sombrero and tequila celebration they had the other morning.

“On Monday, Cinco De Mayo, ‘Way Too Early’ made sarcastic references to the way some Americans celebrate the holiday. It was not our intention to be disrespectful and we sincerely apologize for the ill-advised references,” a statement posted to the show’s website said. Spokesperson Lauren Skowronski said there will also be an on-air apology on Wednesday.

Alex Korson, the executive producer for “Morning Joe” and “Way Too Early,” also called NAHJ president Hugo Balta on Monday to apologize for the segment, according to Balta.

“He apologized for the segment (and) assured me that while the props were planned; the anchors took it upon themselves to put them on and act in the manner they did,” Balta wrote. “He expressed his remorse at how the producers allowed the segment and behavior to continue.”

Balta said Korson told him those involved in the segment would be disciplined.

If it isn’t discipline by tequilaboarding, then, I really don’t feel like accepting the apology.

Lara Spencer of Good Morning America was also called out by the blogosphere. Apparently, even Chicano newsguy John Quiñones was in the mix. But Spencer did offer somewhat of an apology.

Seriously, though, these people don’t need discipline, they need an education!

I can’t wait to see what happens on Diez y Seis, 2014. Please…no grito contests. That’s not what the grito is about. #readahistorybook

My Cinco de Mayo Rant, 2014

So, I woke up at 4 this morning and clicked on the tube so I could watch (or hear as I dozed some more) the news.

It didn’t take long for TV-landia to piss me off when I noticed KHOU had one of their reporters at some bar drinking “virgin” drinks of some sort and some mariachi music in the background. I think I caught a one-line mention of the history behind the holiday.

nachoSo, I fell back asleep and ignored the news, but not before posting one of my favorite quotes by the Texas-born Mexican General Ignacio Zaragoza, “Las armas nacionales se han cubierto de gloria.” (The national arms have been covered with glory.) Which was actually the one-line letter he sent to President Benito Juarez upon winning the Battle of Puebla against a formidable French military.

gma

Courtesy: Getty

So, I made it to the living room and Good Morning America was on. The day got worse! There they are wearing sombreros, drinking fauxgaritas, and, were those annoying “Mexican” noises they were making? And did she just say “Cinco de Drinko”? (Apparently, MSNBC wasn’t far behind.)

I must say, I was a bit miffed. I’m sure they think it was all in fun–people have found any reason to drink on special days like July 4, Memorial Day, etc. Why not 5 de Mayo? Right? But the fact that it was all about getting drunk made for a crappy morning.

In fact, Cinco de Mayo is a very American holiday and it should be celebrated. But, hell, learn a little history about it! Or, if you know about it, don’t minimize it with drunkenness! Whether the Cinco celebrations were started by Mexican expats living in the states after the victory, or by Chicanos establishing and celebrating their identity here in the Southwest, the bottom line is there is some real history to this holiday. But when news agencies take the “drinko” route, they’re doing a huge disservice, especially when such a teachable moment exists.

Then again, this is a nation of fools who still haven’t figured out the difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day (I’m pointing at you, Tea Party!). So, I guess I’ll just enjoy my traditional Cinco de Mayo meal of hot wings and a Miller 64, and try to plan-out a battle re-enactment for next year. I’m stuck between hosting a French Toast eating contest and a croissant toss, but I’ll get back to you on that.