NALEO Releases Electoral Profile of Texas

The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has released their 2012 Primary Election Profile of the State of Texas. If you like stats, this is your report.

Here are some of the highlights:

ELECTORAL COLLEGE VOTES: 38
TOTAL POPULATION (2010): 25,145,561
LATINO POPULATION (2010): 9,460,921
PROJECTED LATINO VOTE IN 2012: 1,987,000
PROJECTED LATINO SHARE OF TEXAS VOTE: 21.3%

The report reminds us that, historically, Texas has voted for a Republican Presidential nominee; however, 2008 saw a marked change when John McCain only managed 55%. In this case, Latinos gave nominee Barack Obama 63% of their vote.

Of particular interest to me was the number of Latino voters that are registered. Although there are organizations out there trying to increase the number of registrations, it’s always good to know what you’ve got.

Texas’ Registered Voters (May 2012)

Nearly one of every four Texas registered voters (24%) is Latino.

Latino voter turnout in Texas’ Presidential elections grew from 1.3 million in 2000 to 1.7 million in 2008, an increase of 31%.

Ultimately, these stats tell us that population growth is not our strength as much as registered voters. If 1 in 4 registered voters in Texas is Latino, then we can move an election. Heck, Latinos can effect monumental change.

And if in eight years, we have only managed to increase voting by a few hundred thousand voters, then something is very wrong, but I would venture to say it is well-funded campaigns and their minions (same old consultants) who have little idea of how to energize the Latino electorate. As I’ve said many times, you can’t just translate without making your literature and your positions culturally relevant.

Thanks to NALEO for the report.

Bottom line:  There’s a lot of work to do. The Democratic Primary is just about done and turnout is dismal. November must be in our sights.

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