Tag Archives: 2017

I Guess That’s Why They Call It Marketing

84-lumber-1-e1486347383327Ever since January 20, or maybe November 8, Americans have been trying to find meaning or hope in just about anything. And the Super Bowl was definitely in play.

The anti-Trumpistas were rooting for Atlanta. Hope was sought out from Coca-Cola, AirBNB, and even Audi regarding various issues. Hell, Gaga blew the roof off (or at least opened the roof ) of NRG Stadium. Then there was Journey84, the 5 minute 45 second ad by 84Lumber.

The shorter TV edition was poignant, showing a mother and daughter on a journey to the United States to seek something. For sure, they were escaping something, too. Soon after, there was internet chisme about Fox Sports not allowing parts of the ad or more of the ad. Some thought of the business ramifications of a corporation using this kind of ad on a hot topic. Then one finds the entire ad on YouTube (if the Journey84 site wasn’t working) and then you get a clearer picture.

No doubt, with Trump’s policies, emotions are high, especially on the pro-migrant side. People are marching and protesting policies. So, as the long-ad runs, one is really getting into it. Then as the journey continues, the mother and daughter run into Trump’s wall. A little bit more and there are two beautiful wood doors (wood available at 84Lumber, for sure). For me, it brought a quick memory of the Trump narrative.

But as a consolation, which we suppose counts as a new policy proposal, Trump said he would build a “big beautiful door” in the wall to let in legal immigrants.

No surprise, 84Lumber was attacked by Republicans and white supremacists for letting the door open to migrants. Brown-colored migrants. The 84Lumber’s PR machine began to work. And it sounded like the tried-and-true right-wing narrative where they take a solid opposition to “illegal” immigration and support “legal” immigration, without much of plan of action to fix the “legal” immigration system. And they certainly aren’t for cartels!

See a mother & daughter’s symbolic journey toward becoming legal American citizens.

So, apparently, the beautiful doors stand for US Citizenship and Immigration Services? (You know, where the “back of the line” everyone talks about is?)

The ad campaign would have been more sincere if it had exhibited what the “legal” immigration system looks like today. Decades long backlogs and slow processing times and increased fees in large part are what make the “back of the line” Republican narrative a lie. And with Trump’s policies of walls and deportations, I don’t think the Trump-supportive CEO of 84Lumber really cares about anything regarding migrants. It’s all about their bottom line and their recruitment policies.

But, wow, was that a good ad, right?

There’s a reason corporations spend $5 million for 30 seconds of airtime on Super Bowl Sunday, and it’s not to change bad public policies. If that were the intent, they’d give the money to ACLU, Planned Parenthood, MALDEF, etc. It’s about a return on their investment and nothing else. And if they do it by capturing your heart and mind, and you’re OK with no change in public policy for the better, well, they got you.

Of course, I’m not sure playing both sides of the issue is smart business. It could be that they just wasted $5 million.

 

 

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Trump Leaves DACA Alone For Now

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Credit:  Lalo Alcaraz

 

The Trump campaign-turned-administration has perfected the way it instills fear in communities. Of course, the fear has created plenty of activists who will hopefully remain committed to a multitude of issues utilized by Trump to gain enough votes in a few states to win the electoral vote.  Monday was a stressful day for DACA beneficiaries–numbering about 750,000 nationally. By mid-afternoon, it seemed Trump left Obama’s executive order which created the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals alone.

Even his COS Priebus and his alternative mouthpiece Spicer seemed to try to calm pro-migrant forces a bit by stating that the priority is “criminal” immigrants. Cesar Espinosa, ED of FIEL, a local immigrant rights group, asked, “What is ‘criminal?'”

The Obama administration used the same kind of program to deport 3 million and warehouse thousands more in private prisons. Early on, the majority of deportees were convicted of low-grade, non-deportable crimes, but were still sent to home countries, breaking up families, and affecting local economies. Now, with 750,000 DACA lives hanging in the balance, hundreds of thousands more of their parents, and millions more who are simply working and contributing to their communities waiting for Trump’s next move, there’s more fear and stress in the community.

The lack of action by Trump today didn’t provide much comfort. Activists, though, are looking to leadership at the local level.

The newly elected Sheriff of Travis County, Sally Hernandez announced her department would not cooperate with the Trump administration and has earned the ire of Greg Abbott who has gotten really good at making threats about funding. El Paso’s Democratic Sheriff, on the other hand, has decided to cooperate with Trump because he fears losing grant money.

Locally, activists await action from new Sheriff Ed Gonzalez. Gonzalez promised to rid the department of 287g, an immigrant removal program which provides grant money to the department. Since taking office, he hasn’t mentioned anything about that promise, and already there is the start of a movement requesting action from him and Mayor Sylvester Turner.

It’s only Day 5 and real issues are now being discussed. And we also have the Texas Lege to deal with who are bringing out multiple cans of crazy. Let’s stay focused.

A State Rep Working On Real Issues

With today’s news that Dan Patrick is more interested in potties and sending back billions in federal education dollars to DC, it’s time to remind folks that there are folks representing us in Austin that are actually serving their constituents.

Last weekend, I attended State Rep. Gene Wu’s (HD137) town hall. Having lived in the district for a few years, I had yet to attend one, but since this one would have much to do with moving toward a set of legislative priorities, I thought I’d better go.

Upon arrival, I found a pretty diverse crowd that looked just like Houston. “De todo un poco,” or, a little of everything. And Wu didn’t make the meeting all about him, though I wouldn’t blame him since he’s up for re-election. In fact, he showcased some local experts on issues, such as education, health care, and public safety.

H.D. Chambers, chief at Alief ISD, presented on the realities about public education in the area, and especially on the lawsuit filed by numerous Texas school districts regarding education finance. (The lawsuit was decided today by the Texas Supreme Court and, let’s just say, the kids, the people, and the schools lost). The lawsuit was mainly about having the courts decide how enough resources would be provided to meet expectations that we place on our schools. The Court decided that the state met minimum constitutional standards of funding.

Anyway, he reminded us that there are 5 million students in K-12, but that there are 3.5 million children age 0-3, who by 4 should be getting into Pre-K. Of course, Pre-K support from the state is non-existent. This poses a major threat to the future of Texas, which includes a startling statistic:  If a child cannot read by 3rd grade, there is a 35% chance that the child will dropout of school.

Freddy Warner from the Memorial Hermann system spoke regarding health care from a major system standpoint. He stated that health care and education are among the top funding priorities in the Texas legislature and that in the coming session, they may be crowding each other out. Considering Texas was just bailed out by the Obama administration regarding Medicaid, one would think that Medicaid expansion would be a priority. Warner stated that there is zero chance it would be addressed as health care doesn’t seem to be a priority for most in Austin. He did mention that Memorial Hermann does provide $1.4 billion in charity care.

A startling statistic he provided is that we shouldn’t be surprised if there is a budget shortfall in 2017. While the State Comptroller based a budget on $65 per barrel oil, we’re currently at $40 ($46 today) per barrel. It just doesn’t look good for our next budget.

Now, take Dan Patrick’s potty boycott of $10 billion of our federal money that we’ve paid into the system into consideration. Now, open a bottle of booze and start worrying.

Next up was Januari Leo of Legacy Health, which is a federally qualified health center. The majority of people seen by them are uninsured who cannot afford the emergency room or private clinics. They weren’t helped when Harris Health changed their qualification threshold, thus cutting 19,000 patients from their services.

With uncompensated care growing, and Obama bailing out Texas Medicaid, if a politician for state or local office (Republicans) promised you a cut in property taxes, it is not going to happen. Texas needs to pay its bills. How that is accomplished when we take losses in oil revenue, dismal tax collections and other budgetary nightmares into consideration, well, go ahead and open a second bottle of booze.

The public safety presentations by Assistant County Attorney Vinson and Lt. Conn from HPD centered on some of the things their agencies are working on. The County Attorney’s office is mostly working on ridding the district of nuisance businesses–massage parlors and after-hours clubs. They attract crime, drugs, etc. HPD’s Midwest division helps businesses develop surveys of the areas they serve as to type of crimes and how to protect themselves. They have programs to work at Lee HS with at-risk youth.

Overall, a very interesting meeting that has prepared me for the 2017 session. While State Rep. Wu will definitely have a list of priorities based on open communications with constituents, he’ll have to deal with some of the odd-ball and bigoted priorities being presented by Dan Patrick and his potty buddies.

Ultimately, elections matter. We have a run-off coming up and early voting begins on May 16. You best start practicing for November.

Thanks to Rep. Wu’s staff for putting on an informative meeting and for that open door.