Tag Archives: 2022

The Stace Slate – 2022 Dem Run-Off

It’s that time again. Early voting for the 2022 Democratic Run-off begins on Monday, May 16 and continues through May 20. Run-off Election Day is on Tuesday, May 24. You can find your nearest polling location by clicking here. Need a sample ballot? Find yours by clicking here.

And for whom am I voting?

Here’s the Stace Slate:

Lt. Governor – Mike Collier

Attorney General – Rochelle Garza

Comptroller – Angel Luis Vega

Land Commissioner – Sandragrace Martinez

Judge, 185th District – Jason Luong (Incumbent)

Judge, 208th District – No Recommendation

Judge, 312th Family District – Clinton “Chip” Wells (Incumbent)

Judge, County Civil Court #4 – Treasea Treviño

County Commissioner, Precinct 4 – Lesley Briones

Races not on my ballot, but maybe on yours.

Justice of the Peace, Pct 1, Place 2 – Sonia Lopez

Congress, District 38 – Diana Martinez Alexander

State Rep, District 147 – Danielle Keys Bess

Others further away.

Congress, District 28 – Jessica Cisneros

Bexar County Judge – Ina Minjarez

Are You Ready for the Democratic Run-Offs?

Well, the vote counts are in, despite the whining of the Trumpy, Abbott-appointed Secretary of State and republinuts who probably started all the whining, and we can see who will be facing off in the run-off in a couple of months. This is what we see, so far, locally.

US Rep, District 38 – Diana Martinez Alexander, Duncan Klussman

Lt. Governor – Mike Collier, Michelle Beckley

Attorney General – Rochelle Mercedes Garza, Joe Jaworski

State Comptroller – Angel Luis Vera, Janet Dudding

Land Commissioner – Sandragrace Martinez, Jay Kleberg

SBOE – 4 – Staci Childs, Coretta Mallett-Fontenot

State Rep, 147 – Danielle Keys Bess, Jolanda Jones

Judge, 185th District – Jason Luong, Andrea Beall

Judge, 208th District – Beverly Armstrong, Kimberly McTorry

Family Judge, 312th District – Clinton “Chip” Wells, Teresa Waldrop

Judge, County Civil Court #4 – Treasea Trevino, MK Singh

County Commissioner, Pct. 4 – Lesley Briones, Ben Chou

Justice of the Peace, Pct 1-2 – Sonia Lopez, Steve Duble

Those in italics are not on my ballot, but maybe they are on yours. Either way, all of us will have a busy run-off ballot. Those in bold are folks I’m voting for and/or rooting for. Those races I haven’t picked, well, I haven’t learned anything about them, yet.

Outside of Harris County, eyes will be looking toward South Texas where there will be some interesting run-offs, including CD28 where Jessica Cisneros gets one more chance to unseat the old, searched-thru furniture that is Henry Cuellar. Kuff has a good round-up on all of the run-offs in Texas.

Kuff also expands on the coverage of the printer/paper ballot issues at Harris County. I agree that more voter education and election worker training is needed to ensure people don’t scuff their paper ballots while voting. Hell, even I held my paper ballot sheets gently and from a corner while voting on the machine because I worried about it folding or whatever. Ultimately, less that one percent of ballots were damaged, but counting them just added to the delays in results because Longoria and her staff are trying to ensure actual vote security.

What we really need less of is voter suppression from the Lege with laws like SB1, whose mail ballot issues caused even more delays for election staff. And maybe local news media that treats this story in an educative manner (Miya Shay), rather than in a sensational manner (the other reporters).

It’s Dem Primary Election Day 2022!

OK, folks! If you didn’t vote early, today is the day to VOTE so you can pick your choices for the November ballot! Print out your sample ballot here. Find a polling location here. Remember you can vote at any polling location in Harris County. Take a photo ID, your sample ballot, (AND A MASK), because there are too many names to remember.

Also, the 2022 Stace Slate is available for printing. (For those races not on my ballot, here are my choices for those.) There are a lot of slates out there–some are pretty dangerous anti-Democratic ones, too. I think mine are the best.

All that said, I’m glad it’s over today. As Dem primaries go, this one didn’t have too many explosive happenings. Sure, County Judge Lina Hidalgo’s Dem opponents came off as Republican-Lite in their attacks. And the dude wanting to unseat County Commissioner Pct 2 Adrian Garcia came off as the typical angry dude, but that may have been his target audience.

In the Pct 4 Commish race, Leslie Briones and Ben Chou and the rest ran races about who was the best for the job. I was hoping to have seen a response to Chou’s pothole vid-ad using one of those pothole patching trucks that are the rave, though. In open seat races, it’s all about introducing ones self and stating ones case. Not too much controversy.

But in the judicial races, particularly the Criminal Courts, there was talk of opponents to incumbent judges being recruited by the local DA, using bond reform and crime as a scare tactic. Of course, it doesn’t help when people who bond out are committing crimes once back on the streets, thanks to bail bondsmen discounting the cost of bail bonds instead of keeping the cost at 10%. It never fails that those who rake in the cash from the criminal justice system are the least blamed or reformed by the system. And the ignorance among the voters continues and is exploited by bad people, especially republicans. It was hard to figure out who was whom on the Dem side, but if you voted for all or most of the incumbent judges in the criminal courts, then you came out pretty good. Let’s hope that this is the result tonight.

The best thing about the end of the primary is the end of republinut ads. From blaming migrants escaping poverty and violence for their suburban kid’s fentanyl and other drug addictions, to labeling a right-wing zealot former justice as “woke” when she’s pretty sleepy, to some pendejo riding daddy’s 4-wheeler from the huntin’ ranch at the border wall, to a threat by a nut-job running for Congress against people protesting police violence, to demeaning and violent right-wing statements flashing on screen, the republinuts took fear-mongering to new levels.

Republinuts have always been about fear-mongering; unfortunately, Dems not of color have been in denial about this for decades. (My guess is they were defending their nice, yet racist, neighbors and relatives.) Dems who vote in the republican primary for the “better” nut-job are the worse. And look at where all of us are now. On top of being constantly attacked, it’s the policies that are taking effect that are hurting people. It’s weak Democrats who use the same scare tactics who weaken the Democratic message.

Anyway, the state of Texas keeps digging itself into a bigoted hole that will be harder to dig out of. We have good candidates in Beto O’Rourke, Mike Collier, Rochelle Garza and others to offer a real alternative. Despite the failures of Greg Abbott, County Judge Lina Hidalgo and a Democratic majority on Commissioner’s Court have led us through a pandemic while keeping their promises of transparency and open-government–the two things that scare republicans the most. We have a good team for the most part. But we need to VOTE to keep them.

So, get out there, make your voice heard. And don’t fall for the republican bullshit.

The Other Side of the Stace Slate

My voting experience went pretty flawlessly at Tracy Gee on Day 1 of the Primary. The TDL was scanned, my information appeared, and I was given excellent instructions before heading to my station to vote. And I wasn’t even asked to remove my mask to prove my identity.

All in all, I think there were 89 candidates that I picked, though, some were unopposed. But those contested races did add up to a few minutes of clicking through the ballot and ensuring I clicked the right person. A few minutes. Not bad at all if you go prepared.

Now, some have asked who I’m picking in other races. Hell, I don’t live in those districts! But some are my friends and I know they appreciate the support. Others probably despise me for making picks, so, con mas ganas I’ll make a pick! More than anything, just vote…in the Democratic Primary! Find your sample ballot and your polling location.

So, here is The Other Side of the Stace Slate:

Congress, District 38 – Diana Martinez Alexander

SBOE, District 4 – Larry McKinzie

State Senator, District 17 – Titus Benton

State Senator, District 15 – Molly Cook

State Rep, District 131 – Alma Allen

State Rep. District 132 – Chase West

State Rep., District 142 – Candis Houston

State Rep, District 147 – Reagan Flowers

County Commissioner, Pct 2 – Adrian Garcia

JP, Pct 1 – 2 – Victor Lombraña (Sonia Lopez is also a good choice.)

JP, Pct 2 – 2 – Dolores Lozano

The Stace Slate featuring those for whom I could vote is right here.

The 2022 Stace Slate – Dem Primary

It’s time for another Stace Slate and it’s a big one as is our ballot in the Democratic Primary. My picks are based on observation, issues, and information found along the way, mostly thanks to Charles Kuffner and the Erik Manning spreadsheet. Sometimes, all it takes is a candidate to ask nicely for support. (Note: The ones that asked nicely this year don’t even have opponents in the Primary, so, there’s a lesson for challengers and incumbents alike.) It never fails that half the candidates are happy with my picks and the other half not so much. Hopefully, we can all unite for November.

DosCentavos is not a PAC, no memberships are needed, no ads are required to be purchased as with some other sites, and there’s no club vote. It’s mostly just me, as well as some discussion with friends and siblings regarding what we think about certain candidates. When it comes time to vote, many friends and relatives ask me my thoughts, or for a list of candidates for whom to vote. So, the Stace Slate is a tradition that is in its 17th year.

Also, there won’t be minions at polling locations passing out cards. So, print it out and take it with you!

Early voting begins on February 14th and continues through February 25th. Then, Primary Day is March 1. Find your sample ballot and early voting location here.

So, here is the 2022 Dem Primary Stace Slate:

Governor – Beto O’Rourke

Lt. Governor – Mike Collier

Attorney General – Rochelle Garza (Jaworski and Merritt are also strong candidates)

State Comptroller – Angel Luis Vera

Land Commissioner – Jinny Suh

Ag Commissioner – Susan Hays

Judge 183rd – Chuck Silverman (I)

Judge 184th – Abigail Anastasio (I)

Judge 185th – Jason Luong (I)

Judge 189th – Lema May Barazi

Judge 208th – Greg Glass (I)

Judge 228th – Frank Aguilar (I)

Judge 230th – Chris Morton (I)

Judge 245th – Tristan Longino (I)

Judge 248th – Hilary Unger (I)

Judge 263rd – Amy Martin (I)

Judge 270th – Dedra Davis (I)

Judge 280th – Damiane Curvey

Judge 312th – Paul Calzada

Judge 313th – Natalia Oakes (I)

Judge 315th – Leah Shapiro (I)

Judge 482nd – Sherlene Cruz

Judge County Civil #4 – Tresea Treviño

Judge County Criminal #2 – Jannell Robles

Judge County Criminal #3 – Staci Biggar

Judge County Criminal #5 – David Fleisher (I)

Judge County Criminal #6 – Selina Alaniz (It’s not often when I get to vote for a fellow South Texan who has found success in the big city, like so many of us.)

Judge County Criminal #7 – Andrew Wright (I)

Judge County Criminal #8 – Franklin Bynum (I)

Judge County Criminal #10 – Juanita Jackson

Judge County Criminal #14 – David Singer (I)

Judge Probate #2 – Michael Newman (I)

County Judge – Lina Hidalgo (I)

District Clerk – Marilyn Burgess (I)

County Treasurer – Dylan Osborne (I)

County Commish Pct 4 – Lesley Briones

JP Pct 5 – 2 – Eman Afshar

14th Court Place 2 – Cheri Thomas

14th Court Place 9 – William Demond

Other races not on my ballot…Tuesday.

Judge Lina Hidalgo Files for Re-Election

As I mentioned in my Thoughts on Viernes, HCDP has a running album of folks who have filed for the 2022 Primary. I mentioned that I prefer seeing candidates in the order of filing, rather than alpha-order, because I want to see who has their stuff together, who is dawdling, and who makes a grand entrance.

Well, County Judge Lina Hidalgo took a nice-sized group of supporters with her for her filing, exhibiting the grassroots support with which she began and that put her in office a few years ago. I don’t expect much to change as she has been able to strengthen that grassroots support by accomplishing much as the County’s top executive; especially during the pandemic.

DosCentavos will proudly support Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo for re-election. I supported her when she tossed her hat in the ring back in 2016 and never doubted she could take down a long-time incumbent. She has led well.

That said, as Kuff tells us, Judge Hidalgo has a couple of opponents. One is a perennial candidate and the other is a minion employee of a local wannabe kingmaker and bachelor party coordinator. The candidate also happens to be on the county education board. Anyway, I’m sure Kuff will be asking all the right questions in his interviews of all the candidates. As the candidate financial reports come out, we will find out who is funding the opposition and also who is feeding from that trough.

Former State Rep Gina Calanni Enters Race for Pct 4 Commish

The newly redrawn Precinct 4 is quite busy, as folks will notice.

Former State Rep of District 132 Gina Calanni has entered the race for the Dem nod for County Commish Pct 4.

Calanni states her proven success at the Texas Capitol as a “bold advocate that understands what it means to work hard and struggle for their loved ones, and for what they believe in” makes her the one to be the candidate. Calanni is running on issues, such as climate change policy and infrastructure to minimize the impact of severe weather events, as well as ensuring health care and mental health services that are accessible. Issues that affect the western reaches of Harris County and all of Harris County.

More on Gina Calanni:

Former State Representative Gina Calanni is Vice President of Finance for CalyxPure, an American manufacturer of air purification devices and LEDs, an author, cancer survivor, and mom of three boys.

Gina is running for Harris County Commissioner Precinct 4 to continue serving the public as an unyielding voice for Texas families. Gina firmly believes in giving all Texans the opportunity to pursue success and happiness, no matter their race, ethnicity, zip code, gender, or sexual orientation. She is ready to continue the fight for critical issues like increasing access to affordable healthcare, tackling rising property taxes, defeating the plague of human trafficking locally, and making sure Harris County is equipped to handle future catastrophic weather events.

The big news in her press release is that she has earned the endorsement of her former colleague, State Rep Gene Wu (District 137). Wu cites the hardships Calanni has overcome which have made her a fierce advocate for Texas families. “It’s about time Texans had someone fighting for them and not just wealthy donors.”

I guess we’ll need to wait until January to see who’s getting the big money.

So, the race for the new Precinct 4 Commish seat gets more interesting despite republican whining about redistricting.

Voters have their homework to do in learning more about the candidates–a lot more than waiting for direct mail pieces with photos of endorsers. While the issues will have their similarities, it may come down to one question: Who is willing to fight for the issues by not running away from them after the Primary?

Ben Chou Files for Harris Commish Pct 4

We knew it would get busy in the newly redrawn Harris County Precinct 4 and we have another candidate with Ben Chou announcing his candidacy for Commish. Chou is an attorney with government experience. If elected, he would be the first Asian-American and openly gay person on the Commissioner’s Court.

Experienced in the community (he grew up in SW Houston), in DC (worked with Martin O’Malley and Nancy Pelosi), and in the local elections office defending democracy, Chou seems qualified to serve in the office of Commissioner.

From his announcement:

I’m a progressive Democrat, lawyer, and community organizer. I’m running for County Commissioner because I think we need to build a Harris County for all of our residents — one that centers our efforts around the pursuit of economic, racial, and environmental justice; a future we are proud to pass down to our kids.

I’m running because we can accomplish bold reforms while getting the basics done. We’ve got streets filled with potholes, sidewalks left broken for too long, and street lights that don’t turn on. Meanwhile flooding continues to plague our communities as small businesses and neighborhood safety teeter on the brink.

What’s happening in Texas today is appalling. Republicans have effectively banned abortion, are limiting what books can be taught in schools, and are trying to suppress the right to vote. That’s why this moment is so important. I’m running to bring the progressive, bold change needed to Harris County while also fighting back against Republican extremism.

We can’t afford to wait for change. We need leaders who embrace innovation and have a proven record of getting things done – now.

Chou’s priorities outline addressing neighborhood services, flooding and climate change, public safe and criminal justice reform, and democracy and voting rights. His priorities are buttressed by the statement, “We need to create a society where people do not merely support progressive change, but fight for it.”

That said, his endorsers include his former boss, Martin O’Malley, 2020 Pct 3 Commish candidate Diana Martinez Alexander (whom DC supported), former HCDP chair Lane Lewis, among several precinct chairs who reside in Precinct 4.

At this point, I’m taking in all of the information from whomever files before making a decision. So, I urge voters to take in all of the information, as well, before making a decision.

A Few Statewide Candidates to Watch

There have been a few filings for statewide office recently on the Democratic side which are worth watching.

Jinny Suh for Texas Land Commissioner – With Little Brown One Bush headed for a political collapse in his race for AG, the race for Land Commish is wide open. Jinny Suh announced her intent to run a few months ago. The small business owner, lawyer, scientist, former teacher, and founder of a pro-vaccine group, Immunize Texas, wants to ensure the Permanent School Fund, managed by the TLO, is fully funded and that TLO policies are in place to protect the people of Texas. She is the daughter of Korean immigrants who has experienced various twists and turns throughout her life, but has pushed through–much like most Texans.

Michelle Beckley for Lt. Governor – Considered one of the most liberal state reps in Texas, Beckley’s district was made more republican by the Lege, so she has decided to try to unseat Dan Patrick, along with Mike Collier and Matthew Dowd. Citing her legislative experience, Beckley states that her primary opponents have never won an election, while she has won in a tough to win district. Like most Dems, the issues she is running on are Medicaid expansion, fixing the power grid and fully funding public education. Read more about Beckley here.

Luke Warford for Railroad Commissioner – Warford hopes to unseat Wayne Christian, stating, “because I genuinely think this is one of the most important elected offices in the state and because the current people serving on the commission are only looking out for their interests and the interests of their friends, not the interests of Texans.” The Commission’s lack of action after the big freeze took out the power grid is the main theme. Read more about him here.

Stay connected as Democrats fill these statewide candidate slots.

Rochelle Garza Announces for Texas Attorney General

The race for Texas Attorney General had a couple of active candidates in Joe Jaworski and Lee Merritt. They’ve been pressing the flesh and working the state of Texas for a few months. Yesterday, the race added another candidate with former ACLU lawyer Rochelle Garza announcing her candidacy. Here’s her intro video and it’s pretty good.

Garza hits on all the right issues, but also backs it up with experience. As an ACLU lawyer, she represented “Jane,” a 17 year-old immigrant who found out she was pregnant while in detention and wanted to exercise her right to an abortion. ACLU took on the Trump administration who wanted to force the young woman to remain pregnant and ultimately give birth, while Ken Paxton supported that effort. A federal judge ruled in favor of Jane.

As a sister to a brother injured at childbirth, she and her family took on a health care system that fell short to ensure her brother received the care they needed. It’s a story that many Texans experience everyday.

Check out Garza’s intro video. Check out her website. Her entry into the race certainly makes it a battle of regions as far as voter behavior goes. With a couple of months left to finally file, Garza will have to do some catch-up work, but can certainly get some attention in a short time.

Stay connected!