Tag Archives: election

Early Voting Has Begun – Oct 18 – 29, 2021

Early Voting around Harris County has begun and will run through October 29, 2021. You can vote early at any location in Harris County. You can find your sample ballot by clicking here.

On the ballot are eight (8) state propositions and you may also have local school and college board trustee races on your ballot, so, your sample ballot is the best way to find out what’s up.

My ballot will look like this:

State Propositions (Ballotpedia Explains The Propositions)

Prop 1 – Adds pro rodeo foundations to list authorized to hold raffles. (FOR)

Prop 2 – Allows counties to issue bonds to finance redevelopment of towns and cities. (FOR)

Prop 3 – Forbids local government from prohibiting or limiting religious services (when something like COVID-19 or some sort of disaster occurs and the decision is made for the protection of residents). (AGAINST) (Explanation)

Prop 4 – Changes the eligibility requirements for judges to run for office. (FOR)

Prop 5 – Extends State Commission on Judicial Conduct’s power over judicial candidates. (FOR)

Prop 6 – Allows group home residents to name an essential caregiver with visiting rights. (FOR)

Prop 7 – Allows surviving spouses, 55 or older, of disabled persons a limit on school district property taxes. (FOR)

Prop 8 – Allows surviving spouse of military member killed in action to a property tax exemption. (FOR)

ALIEF ISD

Position 4 – Debby Pepper (Endorsed by TSTA)

Position 5 – Randal Stewart

Position 6 – Ronald Franklin (Endorsed by TSTA)

Position 7 – Damon Barone (Endorsed by TSTA)

Bond Prop A – FOR (Bond Descriptions)

Bond Prop B – FOR

Bond Prop C – FOR

Bond Prop D – FOR


While I do not reside in Houston ISD, I do have some favorites.

District I – Elizabeth Santos

District V – Sue Deigaard

District VI – Holly Flynn Vilaseca

District VII – Anne Sung

And, while I await the outcome of whatever is going on with my own HCC trustee, my favorites for whom I am not able to vote are:

HCC District 3 – Adriana Tamez

HCC District 8 – Eva Loredo

Get your voting done early. Otherwise, you can vote on November 2.

The 2021 Alief ISD Bond

Along with a few races for school trustee, we Alief ISD voters get to decide on over $500 million in bonds to address aging facilities and buses, athletics upgrades, modernization of the stadium, and more technology. With a small tax increase and no tax increase for 65 and older, this kind of investment is needed for this growing district. Sounds good enough, so, let’s dive a little into it.

According to the district, it has been six years since the last bond and that bond came in on time, on target, and under budget. I must say, it’s nice to see the new buildings that have gone and are going up at the moment that address student career needs, staff development needs, and transportation needs. Currently, the average age of school buildings is 35 years, so, it is time to continue upgrading to ensure equity around the district.

The bond has been broken up into four parts (state law, I’ve been told by a committee member).

Prop A is for $482.6 million to pay for safety and security upgrades for school entrance and more funds for ISD police; two replacement schools; a new agri-center on the site of the Alief Community Garden; all sorts of renovations; for Fine Arts, new instruments, sound-proof practice rooms, dance flooring, and theater lighting.; new equipment for Career and Tech Education programs; and new buses to transport students.

I like Prop A and will vote for it.

Prop B is for $9.1 million in athletic upgrades to include tennis court resurfacing; dugouts at Hastings HS baseball field; gym scoreboards; resurfacing baseball/softball fields; replacement of football turf; and replacement of outdoor scoreboards.

The wealth seems to be spread around the various sports, so, I’m thinking YES on this one. Better turf means increased safety for athletes and less maintenance needs.

Prop C calls for $19.4 million to modernize Crump Stadium. According to the district, the stadium is almost 50 years old and has not had much in investment in improvement. The stadium was also built when enrollment was less than 20% of what it has become. So, they are asking for this cash to build a new press box, new turf, new track, new locker rooms, and one of those fancy video scoreboards.

When I cruised around the district, the first thing I noticed was how modern the stadium was, considering it was 50 years old. It seems they were ahead of the game when it was built. New track and new turf not only ensures safety, but it also makes the stadium attractive for playoff and other community events. It is stuff that is needed, but it is also pricey. The first time I voted against a bond, I lived in Humble ISD because it was too football-centric, but the total package here seems to be about the students. I’m trending toward supporting Prop C because why should the “fancy” school districts get all the nice stuff? Also, at least they didn’t ask for some $200 million monstrosity.

Prop D calls for $30.6 million for technology upgrades. A reminder that there are now over 50,000 students and staff at Alief ISD and they are deserving of the best. The bond ensures the district keeps a tech replacement schedule for the next three years. The bond includes classroom instructional technology; campus iPads and desktops.

Yes, I’m for it. I wish it would have been twice as much!

Anyway, that’s my take on the Alief ISD bond. Early voting begins October 18 and runs through October 29. Election Day is November 2. I’m still trying to find more information about candidates for school trustee. There are a few of those races on the ballot, which makes up a good chunk of the board being chosen, so, this is important.

Thanks to all those neighbors who participated in the bond committee–89 strong, working for 6 months, and over 2000 hours. It is said that if passed, Alief ISD will save over 65 million bucks in escalating construction costs and inflation. I know I have that in mind, especially as the pandemic continues.

For more information, visit the bond website!

Early Voting for Houston ISD and HCC Begins Today

That’s right, some of y’all need to vote, again.

First of all, I misblogged the other day when I stated Alief ISD would have a run-off. In reality, the candidate with the most votes wins. So, DC-endorsed Natasha Butler, who won by 11 votes, joins Breaux, Nguyen, and Key on the board. Congrats to all of them. Serve the kids and the rest of us well.

Meanwhile, as many as 78,000+ voters will have the opportunity to elect a new HISD Trustee in District I. Voters will choose between Elizabeth Santos, who earned 45% of the vote in Round 1, and Gretchen Himsl. Another 55,000+ voters in District III will get to pick between Jesse A. Rodriguez and Sergio Lira. Almost 10,000 and over 3500 voted in District I and III, in Round 1, respectively.

As far as nods are concerned, I’ll say most of my friends are supporting Elizabeth Santos in District I, and my friends seem split in District III, but I’ve been rooting for Jesse A. Rodriguez.

In HCCS District IX, Preta VanDible Stalworth is the progressive candidate in the mix. And that’s all I’ll say about that. District IX is in Southern Harris County and stretches from around the Southwest Freeway to beyond 288 to zip code 77048. Around 100,000 voters get to choose in this one, though a little over 10K voted in Round 1.

With just a fraction of local voters eligible to vote in these races, you might ask yourself:  Can I vote in this one? Check and see if you have a ballot here. Then find your early voting location here.

So, get out and vote. It really does count in these low turnout elections.

 

The Stace Slate – 2015

Here’s for whom I’m  voting:

Mayor………………………..Adrian Garcia

City Council At Large 1…..Lane Lewis

City Council At Large 2….David Robinson

City Council At Large 3….Doug Peterson

City Council At Large 4….Amanda Edwards

City Council At Large 5….Philippe Nassif

City Council District F…..Richard Nguyen

City Controller…………….Chris Brown

City of Houston Proposition 1……………….YES!

City of Houston Proposition 2……………….YES

Harris County Proposition 1, 2, 3, and 4………………….FOR

Alief ISD Position 1……….Lily Truong

Texas Prop 1- AGAINST

Texas Prop 2- FOR

Texas Prop 3- AGAINST

Texas Prop 4- AGAINST

Texas Prop 5- AGAINST

Texas Prop 6- AGAINST

Texas Prop 7- AGAINST

I Can’t Vote in These Races, But I Encourage You To Vote For:

Houston City Council District H…….Jason Cisneroz

Houston City Council District I……..Robert Gallegos

Houston City Council District J……..Mike Laster

Houston ISD District VIII……………..Juliet Stipeche

Houston ISD District III……………….Ramiro Fonseca

Aldine ISD Position 1…………………..Tony Diaz

HCC District III…………………………..Adriana Tamez

HCC District VIII…………………………Eva Loredo

Some Initial Thoughts on November 2012

The unofficial tally is at 100%, and I’m thinking they await some overseas and provisional ballots to be counted, but it seems that Dems had a so-so night. Here are some thoughts, and, of course, I’ll start with the obvious one.

Julia Maldonado for 14th Court (and the others). Given 2008’s results, my thoughts were that appellate court candidates would need to get upwards of 55% in Harris County to win in a climate in which they would lose the other nine counties (badly) in the area served. We all hoped for Fort Bend to be closer or a win, too. Ultimately only two of the appellate candidates managed to cross the 50-yard line in Harris County, with Maldonado’s 50.55% and Barbara Gardner garnering over 51% in the latest count. Both were quite active on the trail, and I personally witnessed Julia putting up 4 x 8 signs down the block from me and around the ten counties. She’s as good with a mallet (for the big posts) as she would have been with a gavel. As far as Julia is concerned, she was out-raised and outspent by an organized multi-candidate effort, but that didn’t stop her from finishing the race at full gallop. She fell 86,000+ votes short, but we really enjoyed “winning” Harris County by almost 13K votes.

One upsetting point in this one is the undervote of 63,000. I sort of expected it after hearing a voter at a poll ask for assistance in only voting for Obama and the Sheriff. Was this a common occurrence? If so, it may speak to the Sheriff’s race only having an undervote of 43,000. Color me annoyed.

Sheriff Adrian Garcia – Obviously, I (and my pro-migrant colleagues) have been critics of Garcia’s continued support of 287(g) and SCOMM as a source of money for his department. At some point, one realizes that the alternative is the devil incarnate and one just shuts up and roots for Garcia as I did. (Plus, he’s a good person, and you can’t go too wrong with that.) That said, the criticism can now continue and I hope he continues to be receptive, especially as the debate for Comprehensive Immigration Reform hops up sooner than later in Washington, DC. Otherwise, Sheriff Garcia earned this re-election because of a successful first term that brought some sanity and good management to the HCSO. So, congrats to him!

Diane Trautman for HCDE – Diane seems to have enjoyed some crossover appeal, which is not surprising given the fact that Republicans were abandoning Diane’s opponent much like they abandoned Sheriff Garcia’s opponent. Along with Erica Lee, Democrats will have a majority on the board, and that’s a good thing. Congrats to Diane and Erica!

The County Judicials – As the numbers were slowly coming in, there’s no doubt that many of us were worried about the ultimate outcome regarding our Judges. Those last precincts put most of our incumbent Dems ahead; although, I am worried about some of my favorites, like Judge Josefina Rendon and Hazel Jones. The varied margins tell us some of our Judges had better crossover appeal than others, too. The reasons? Well, that’s up for debate, I’m sure.

Gene Wu for HD-137 – It’s been a long time since I voted for a Texas House candidate that actually won! This may take some getting used to; and not just the fact that he’s a Democrat, but the fact that he’ll be responsive to his constituents (Joe Crabb sucked at that up in Kingwood). Good job, Team Wu!

Obviously, we have a waiting game. Ann Harris Bennett is 2500 down and any ballots left to be counted may provide a clearer picture. Is it enough? It’s hard to tell from what Stanart told News 92 this morning–there’s thousands of overseas and provisionals, whatever that means.

I’ll be working up some more thoughts later; especially on the oft-credited for Obama’s victory Latino vote.

Fun stuff!