Tag Archives: texas governor

Run-Offs, Victories, and Tear-Jerkers

I’ll just comment a little on some of the races that were on my radar.


Congrats to State Senator Sylvia Garcia on a decisive victory based on a disciplined campaign that surged from beginning to end. This, despite a big money newbie who came in from Beaumont to challenge her. Ultimately, all that big money guy did was take the oxygen out of the other challengers who were mostly ignored in the race. There are a couple in there with a lot of potential, so, they should keep active in the local scene and the Party. I wasn’t worried about the Senator as she had a pretty great team of campaign workers doing the GOTV.


With Senator Garcia’s victory, she will have an easier fall campaign since CD29 is a Dem seat. Eventually and some time after she wins CD29, the Senator will resign her SD6 position, and already State Reps Ana Hernandez and Carol Alvarado have announced their intentions to run for the seat. Of course, a special election date will not be set until that resignation and at the Governor’s leisure. Best guess:  May, 2019? Thankfully, neither Hernandez nor Alvarado will be required to resign and will serve during the next Lege session. So, stay tuned.

Rabeea Collier and Judicial Campaigns

Rabeea Collier, running for the 113th Civil District Court, achieved quite a victory with 73% of the vote, defeating an inexperienced, yet self-funded, lawyer. Rabeea will be among some great lawyers in the running to serve Harris County in various courts. Among the winners yesterday were Lauren Reeder, Cory Sepolio, Christine Weems, Barbara Stalder, David Fleischer, Raul Rodriguez, etc. We’ll have the long list soon.

My best wishes to Kathy Vossler, Fred Cook, Harold Landreneau, Juan Aguirre and Tracy Good. You all ran great races and are great lawyers whom I will always respect and support in your future campaigns.


Countywide Run-Offs

There is still voting to be done on May 22 as Democrats decide in several run-off races. For District Clerk, Marilyn Burgess, who came quite close to winning outright, will take on Rozzy Shorter. For County Clerk, it is Diane Trautman versus Gayle Young Mitchell. For County Treasurer, Cosme Garcia and Dylan Osbourne. And for At-Large Trustee of HCDE Richard Cantu and Josh Wallenstein. I’ve decided in three of the races, but I’ll need to be convinced about the race for treasurer.

By the way, my friend Nile Copeland (3rd place in the Treasurer’s race) had a good enough showing to be asked whom he is supporting in the run-off. Now that he can buy me tacos again without having to report them, I may just ask him.

The Commishes

Congrats to my long-time friend Adrian Garcia on a big win versus a few challengers. He’s the one candidate that can re-take Precinct 2 for the good guys. And what a showing by first-time candidate Penny Shaw in Precinct 4–75%. She earned every vote because she was everywhere, coordinated various events, and created relationships every step of the way. On to November!

Other Run-Off Races

I have all the love and respect for Jim Cargas and Dorina Papageorgiou for all they have done in CD7. Unfortunately, politics can be like kids with new toys at Christmas. Look at all the new candidates!!! Let’s open them up and see what they give us! And they gave plenty of ads, mailers, etc. So, it’ll be Moser vs Fletcher in the run-off. I’ll have to ask my sis whom she is supporting. And Nile Copeland, too!

In SD17, Fran Watson kept the race close in Fort Bend and Brazoria Counties to make it into a run-off with Rita Lucido. Good luck to Fran!


What a showing by former Dallas Sheriff Lupe Valdez with 42% against all those other politically inexperienced candidates. I was impressed with some great showings in South Texas, plus Dallas, Denton, Tarrant, El Paso, and Travis. She shouldn’t ignore Harris County, though, and do everything to cut into her opponent’s local margin. Oh, yeah, I still support Lupe Valdez for Governor.

The End of the Ballot

I heard a lot of chatter from a few political folks who didn’t like the end of the ballot survey questions–that’s all they are, a survey. Hell, I like them. And, apparently, so do the voters. While some of our candidate races had 15 to 20% undervotes, the ballot questions had less than 6% undervoting. I don’t mind if Dem voters talk to us since most of them won’t go to the county and district conventions to form the platform. And if we get some surprise answers we don’t want to hear, well, that just means the Party needs to work harder to ensure we stay true to our values and issues.

See you at the races!


Lupe Valdez Files for Texas Governor; Farm Worker Family Scrutinized

Sheriff Lupe Valdez has filed to run for Texas Governor in the Dem Primary. It was expected and hoped for by many who have thought of the current choices as a complete flatline–including me. Thanks, Lupe!

Like any major candidate, one attempts to connect with voters with a good narrative. And Lupe Valdez has a story.

Valdez was born in San Antonio in 1947, one of eight children in a family of migrant farm workers. She earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Southern Nazarene University — a liberal arts college in Bethany, Oklahoma — before receiving a master’s in criminology and criminal justice from the University of Texas at Arlington.

The story continues with her service in the US Army as a captain, her work as a federal agent with CPB and as an investigator and her trek toward becoming sheriff of the state’s second largest county. If anything, she was among the first Democrats to inject some hope into Dems about Texas one day becoming blue, having been elected Sheriff in that first blue Dallas wave in 2004.

As Sheriff, Valdez hasn’t backed away from Greg Abbott’s politicization of the immigration issue, particularly the use of 287(g). Valdez at one point decided that low-grade undocumented offenders wouldn’t be reported to ICE, earning her the ire of Greg Abbott and a threat that cities and counties who didn’t cooperate would have their funds cut. Her mention of deportations and family separations in her post-filing speech shows she’s the only candidate ready to take on Abbott.

As excited as I am about her candidacy, I was also a bit irked when I read a “fact-check” article about Lupe in which it seemed her farm worker kid life was being questioned.

“I am the youngest of eight children born to migrant workers.”

The fact-checking PolitiFact Texas project based at the Austin American-Statesman hasn’t independently verified that biographical detail.

What’s Selby looking for? Kennedy-esque 8mm video of the family arriving at some midwestern state? Of them going up and down the plowed fields picking sugar beets? Smiling for the camera? Of old pay stubs, which included the deductions for overpriced rent and groceries billed by the farmers, thus taking most of the summer’s paycheck?

South Texas Chicano families of 10 picking sugar beets in Cassleton, North Dakota, cherries in Sturgeon Bay, WI and tomatoes and strawberries in California and Bluffton, Indiana were the norm in the 50’s. That included the Medellins and the Sernas.

I take it a bit personally, having been the son of farm workers. I even had the privilege of hanging out in a sugar beet field one summer that our family needed to go earn some money. It wasn’t that successful a summer–long story. And I’m sure there are plenty of these long stories that are hard to document, but that many of us wear as badges of honor and with which we can identify.

If Selby and others want to know about Chicano farm worker life, then I suggest he watch “…And the Earth Did Not Swallow Him.” The movie based on the autobiography of Crystal City’s Tomas Rivera.

That said, I’m ready to support Lupe Valdez and I look forward to what develops.

UPDATE:  Lupe Valdez has provided the fact-checkers with photos of her migrant days. Instead of black/white photos, my response to them would have been a lot more…colorful.



And Now, Wendy Needs You…

to chip in to her campaign.

wendyWendy Davis answered the call–she is running to be our next Governor of Texas. And now, she needs you to answer the call to chip in.

Much like every vote will matter, so will every dollar. And every dollar doesn’t only help Wendy Davis in her run, but the energy she creates will be passed down to the rest of the Democratic ballot.

Let’s give what you can, and let’s do it often. You’d be surprised how it adds up–pretty much like the votes will add up for Wendy next November.

Click on the link below to show your support.

Goal Thermometer